Most web designers gain new clients by either calling them or emailing them to see if they need work done, or if they want a quote on a new website.  That is how we get most of our clients.  Sometimes it goes well, other times not so well.  That is the industry we work on.

I came across an interesting situation the other day wherein I emailed a potential client and outlined some basic and easy to fix issues on their site and continued by suggesting that they update the look of their site as well.  Some of the issues (broken links, no DOCTYPE) were so blatantly obvious and easy to fix that this clients son or daughter could have gone through their site and fixed this stuff.

What ended up happening instead, was that the client emailed their designer, probably to fix the issues, and then the designer sent us a nasty email about integrity in business relationships.  Then came the kicker and I kid you not.  They said “If my car has a flat tire, why would I buy a new car?”.

This got me to thinking; Why would anyone try to justify having broken links on their website.  I can understand bad graphics, a lot of people have that, but there is NO EXCUSE for broken links.  Evidently he has never driven a car with a flat tire.  It’s damn near impossible!

If you have a flat tire and don’t have the desire or money to buy a new car, at least fix the flat tire so the car drives properly. 

I have a feeling that this guy is one shady “mechanic” and he is feeding his client a lot of incorrect information.  It is the responsibility of the designer or web architect to explain the need for a working website to his/her clients.  In a day and age where a website is a crucial communication tool to businesses large and small, there should be more emphasis put on making them look good and work well.  Its a simple thing to do.
We always try to teach our clients about proper linking, accessibility issues that they may face, and different ways to make your site more usable to the clients they serve.  This should be a paramount goal in every designers career. Education is key!

  1. Analyzing the issue I guess the client perhaps inadvertently carried your communication with them to their designer, and may have rubbed it in when the flaws were pointed out to them. Other wise they wouldn’t have known the suggestion was coming from your neck of the woods. Anyway, rightly said – “Sad state of designers!”

    George O Pabi